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What Did You Buy Today?
I sold most of my MMM. There will be a better entry point.
new position in BWXT
I went 70% cash today. Sold a lot of names near the highs of the day. Market is becoming way too frothy for me. Better opportunities around the corner. The Fed will stop pumping up the market soon. This can't go on too much longer. The fact that AAPL is at a 52 week is a joke lol. I will be patient and wait for a better opportunity. No need to jump in for a while. I'm quite content going into the summer with cash and knowing I had my best year ever. And I'm not giving it back lol

My goal is to just add to my top 10 holdings on correction and take my picks on companies I like at a big discount.
(06-16-2020, 09:15 PM)divmenow Wrote: I went 70% cash today. Sold a lot of names near the highs of the day. Market is becoming way too frothy for me. Better opportunities around the corner. The Fed will stop pumping up the market soon. This can't go on too much longer. The fact that AAPL is at a 52 week is a joke lol. I will be patient and wait for a better opportunity. No need to jump in for a while. I'm quite content going into the summer with cash and knowing I had my best year ever. And I'm not giving it back lol

My goal is to just add to my top 10 holdings on correction and take my picks on companies I like at a big discount.
See you back here next week then?   Big Grin 

I'm sure you'll get some more buying chances, but I won't be surprised if J. Powell and Trump jawbone the market up on any real dip between now and November.  I can't know for sure if the election will be close, but that doesn't seem like an outrageous thought with all that is going on right now.  That will cause some sector rotations.  Next quarter's earnings is what I have been looking forward to.  Nobody will be all that shocked, but it will bring valuations to light.  I am doing everything slow, and sticking to companies I am comfortable holding for a very long time.  I've been doing that for months though.
Kept adding BMY this morning. About 3/5 of a full position now.
Added small amounts of the following in the past week or so
GEO
PFE
TD
LHX
(06-16-2020, 09:15 PM)divmenow Wrote: I went 70% cash today. Sold a lot of names near the highs of the day. Market is becoming way too frothy for me. Better opportunities around the corner. The Fed will stop pumping up the market soon. This can't go on too much longer. The fact that AAPL is at a 52 week is a joke lol. I will be patient and wait for a better opportunity. No need to jump in for a while. I'm quite content going into the summer with cash and knowing I had my best year ever. And I'm not giving it back lol

My goal is to just add to my top 10 holdings on correction and take my picks on companies I like at a big discount.

From a 30,000ft view, here is what I see:

1. Fed is buying almost any kind of debt it can get its hands on, with unlimited funds for purchases and a stated intention to keep debt markets liquid. There is a seller on the other side of those transactions happily receiving dollars for the sale. A few months ago, before unlimited QE, that would have been an unlikely transaction, and the seller likely would have been facing steep losses on the debt due to default risk. That money is now out there, in the markets. 

2. There are three principal methods of reducing sovereign debt:
    (1) Default. Section 4 of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution makes this unconstitutional in America.
    (2) Massive economic growth (this seems unlikely given present circumstances)
    (3) Increasing the money supply to pay down the debt (inflation)

3. UUP is down bigly from its peak. We have printed more money than other developed nations, and the weakened dollar reflects this. 

4. Equity prices tend to inflate to match increases in the money supply. 

5. The Venezuelan stock market is near all-time highs, denominated in its own currency. 

Until I see evidence that the Fed is turning off the firehose of newly created cash, I'm not going to fight them. Much smaller rounds of QE managed to inflate us from an SPY intra-day low of 67 in March, 2009 to over 339 just a few months ago (510%+). Real economic growth over the same period was nowhere close to that. 

A deflationary crash at a time when a majority of Baby Boomers are retiring risks complete societal breakdown. It also puts the security and assets of the owner class at risk. It won't be allowed. Jay Powell didn't exactly face a hostile audience when he began his testimony yesterday. He is doing exactly what the moneyed interests who control our government through lobbying want him to do.
(06-17-2020, 09:45 AM)Otter Wrote:
(06-16-2020, 09:15 PM)divmenow Wrote: I went 70% cash today. Sold a lot of names near the highs of the day. Market is becoming way too frothy for me. Better opportunities around the corner. The Fed will stop pumping up the market soon. This can't go on too much longer. The fact that AAPL is at a 52 week is a joke lol. I will be patient and wait for a better opportunity. No need to jump in for a while. I'm quite content going into the summer with cash and knowing I had my best year ever. And I'm not giving it back lol

My goal is to just add to my top 10 holdings on correction and take my picks on companies I like at a big discount.

From a 30,000ft view, here is what I see:

1. Fed is buying almost any kind of debt it can get its hands on, with unlimited funds for purchases and a stated intention to keep debt markets liquid. There is a seller on the other side of those transactions happily receiving dollars for the sale. A few months ago, before unlimited QE, that would have been an unlikely transaction, and the seller likely would have been facing steep losses on the debt due to default risk. That money is now out there, in the markets. 

2. There are three principal methods of reducing sovereign debt:
    (1) Default. Section 4 of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution makes this unconstitutional in America.
    (2) Massive economic growth (this seems unlikely given present circumstances)
    (3) Increasing the money supply to pay down the debt (inflation)

3. UUP is down bigly from its peak. We have printed more money than other developed nations, and the weakened dollar reflects this. 

4. Equity prices tend to inflate to match increases in the money supply. 

5. The Venezuelan stock market is near all-time highs, denominated in its own currency. 

Until I see evidence that the Fed is turning off the firehose of newly created cash, I'm not going to fight them. Much smaller rounds of QE managed to inflate us from an SPY intra-day low of 67 in March, 2009 to over 339 just a few months ago (510%+). Real economic growth over the same period was nowhere close to that. 

A deflationary crash at a time when a majority of Baby Boomers are retiring risks complete societal breakdown. It also puts the security and assets of the owner class at risk. It won't be allowed. Jay Powell didn't exactly face a hostile audience when he began his testimony yesterday. He is doing exactly what the moneyed interests who control our government through lobbying want him to do.
Good post.  The bottom line is there are too many moving parts to consistently time.  We can't know if the market runs 20% higher, but it's very clear they will stop at nothing to keep it from crashing before the election.  I always keep some cash for the inevitable dips, but you don't have long to decide whether you buy into it.  2021 looks dangerous if the economy doesn't bounce off the bottom we haven't seen just yet.  I'll stay mostly invested but my stocks will be somewhat defensive.  I am not going to get stuck in any large positions where a 30 PE and extremely low growth is a likely outcome for several years.  The risk reward is just not there.  

Nothing wrong with Divmenow protecting a lead though.
Added to ORCL.
Rolled some PRU dividends back into PRU




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