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101 Little Happy Moments
#21
With my spreadsheet I mainly just track the cost basis, dividend yield, yield on cost and total returns on the main sheet. Then I have a tab set up for all of my reinvested dividend shares, another tab tracking the dollar value of dividends received for each holding and a final tab for my transactions.

I have a separate spreadsheet set up where I enter information for dividend increases, splits and other important info for each of my stocks.

I also have a portfolio with the holdings entered into Yahoo Finance and Seeking Alpha so I can get news on the companies and track the fundamentals.

When doing my research I focus on historical earnings and dividend growth, projected earnings, debt load and shareholder friendliness of the company. I use Fastgraphs.com, David Fish's CCC list http://dripinvesting.org/Tools/Tools.asp and Robert Allen Schwartz's dividend CAGR site http://www.tessellation.com/dividends/streaks.html to research.
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#22
I used those sources before and track many of the same things you. Good stuff to know.

Once I learned to use conditional formatting spreadsheets really got fun for me. I've set up buy zones; I plug in a price where I think I should get interested in a stock, whether it be to buy more or just check things out. If the current price falls below my "get interested" price, the cell highlights green. It's like a wake up call. I do the same on the upside too, only I use the analysts' one year target price. I have it set so that if a stock gets within 2% of the estimate, the cell goes red, and I know I should give it a little extra attention.

Hehehehe, it delights me to no end knowing I can make a spreadsheet do that. I'm sure it's pretty basic stuff, but they didn't have excel went I went to college, so I'm a hack but I can get a few things done.

I also look at what next year's income will be, percent of the total income a stock throws off, how much it costs me to hold cash compared to a 3.5% dividend stock, the difference between the current yield and your yield on cost and some other things.
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#23
Count me in on this one -- I'm a spreadsheet junkie as well!
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#24
Wow. After what felt like a long quiet stretch, the start of September has brought a wealth of happy moments in this dividend growth investor’s life! Here’s the haul I find in my brokerage account:

TGT – 0.167 new shares
JNJ – 2.021 new shares
PFE – 1.839 new shares
WFC – 0.719 new shares
INTC – 7.684 new shares
PSX – 0.275 new shares
COP – 2.430 new shares
AFL – 0.613 new shares
F – 1.224 new shares

Together, those dividends add $676.30 to my net worth, and about $23.52 to my annual income stream.

And of course don’t forget about the extra special happy moments that stocks like MO and PM have provided recently with their healthy dividend raises!
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#25
Very nice, looking forward to the day when my re-investments start buying more than a whole share!

So far in September I have received payments from AFL, ABC, CHD, CMI, PSX, VVC, WMT, WFC, RGR, IBM, CVX, LO, NSC, TGT, MSFT, MMM and WAG.

I ended up with a record for me $104.26 worth of dividends in June. With new investments in addition to announced dividend increases I should beat that number in September.
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#26
March/June/Sept/Dec is my favorite quarter for the happy little moments. About a fifth of my holdings get a full share each reinvestment. PM is nearly up to a share and a half after this last dividend raise. Looking forward to the day when all of my holdings bring in over a share each quarterly dividend.
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#27
You guys are making me jealous. I'm due for my first dividend reinvestments in by the end of the month, but most of my purchases went ex dividend just before I assembled the portfolio. Sometimes I hate deferred gratification!
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#28
Buying just after ex dividend and having to wait 6+ months to get that dividend is horrible. I've caught myself passing up on adding a stock if it just went ex dividend.
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#29
We're in another quiet stretch for dividends, but I was happy to see a little gift from MO hit my account yesterday. A dividend of about $270, automatically reinvested, netting me about 7.7 new shares and about $14.78 more in annual income. Shy
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#30
Got a couple pieces of "happy moments" good news after the close.

ABC raised the dividend by 11.9%.

WYNN announced a $3 special dividend and increased quarterly dividend by 25%.
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