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Monthly Dividends
#21
(10-07-2014, 03:47 PM)Be Here Now Wrote:
(10-07-2014, 12:48 PM)Joey Batz Wrote: Realty Income (O) is probably my favorite stock for reasons I can't explain. When I started my portfolio at the end of last year, it was the first thing I bought. And when a friend and I started in 2008, we got it when it was around $15/share. The fact that it calls itself "The Monthly Dividend Company" shows me how much of an emphasis they place in growing that dividend (not that a slogan can replace or overrule fundamental analysis, but it does help show what their priorities are).

ARCP is something I just bought recently, as was PSEC some months ago. I'm actually curious as to what everybody thinks about Gladstone (GOOD). I really don't know what to make of them at all. They've had a stable dividend for a long time, but their numbers are all over the place.

When FAST Graphs starts working again I'll give you some screen shots of all 3.

FAST Graphs for GOOD, which looks awful to me, and MAIN, the best of the BDCs.

       
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#22
AGNC is going to start paying monthly. Currently around $22 a share, may pay around .21 a month.
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#23
Maybe it's because I'm not particularly good with charts and graphs, but I can't understand a thing in those.

I looked up MAIN. It's similar to PSEC in what they do, right?
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#24
(10-18-2014, 11:23 AM)Joey Batz Wrote: Maybe it's because I'm not particularly good with charts and graphs, but I can't understand a thing in those.

I looked up MAIN. It's similar to PSEC in what they do, right?

The orange line is the annual earnings per share. The pink line is the annual dividends per share. The black line is the monthly price.

When the black line is above the orange line, the price is considered to be over valued, i.e. relatively expensive. Conversely, when the black line is below the orange line, the price is considered to be under valued, i.e. relatively inexpensive.

When the pink line is above the orange line, the dividend is greater than earnings. If this continues for long enough, the business is not sustainable.

Comparing the two charts, you can see that MAIN is generating sufficient earnings to pay its dividend and GOOD is not.

The second half of each report is a dividend cash flow analysis and comparison to the S&P 500. For the time periods measured, GOOD generated less return based on price appreciation plus dividends paid but not reinvested, than the S&P, and MAIN generated more return.

MAIN and PSEC are both business development companies and are constrained by statute to invest in similar ways. However, there is plenty of latitude within those constraints, and if you take a detailed look at both you will see that MAIN conducts their business much more conservatively than PSEC, taking much less risk with investors' money, and as a result, they generate a much higher total return.

I suggest you read the research published by BDC Buzz on Seeking Alpha.
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#25
Can't find the reference at FastGraphs but if memory serves you want to check the FFO box on FastGraphs for the correct analysis of REITS and I believe mRIETS and possibly BDCs too.


(10-08-2014, 10:57 AM)Be Here Now Wrote:
(10-07-2014, 03:47 PM)Be Here Now Wrote:
(10-07-2014, 12:48 PM)Joey Batz Wrote: Realty Income (O) is probably my favorite stock for reasons I can't explain. When I started my portfolio at the end of last year, it was the first thing I bought. And when a friend and I started in 2008, we got it when it was around $15/share. The fact that it calls itself "The Monthly Dividend Company" shows me how much of an emphasis they place in growing that dividend (not that a slogan can replace or overrule fundamental analysis, but it does help show what their priorities are).

ARCP is something I just bought recently, as was PSEC some months ago. I'm actually curious as to what everybody thinks about Gladstone (GOOD). I really don't know what to make of them at all. They've had a stable dividend for a long time, but their numbers are all over the place.

When FAST Graphs starts working again I'll give you some screen shots of all 3.

FAST Graphs for GOOD, which looks awful to me, and MAIN, the best of the BDCs.
There are people who use up their entire lives making money so they can enjoy the lives they have entirely used up
Frederick Buechner
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#26
(10-22-2014, 01:44 PM)Robandcindy2 Wrote: Can't find the reference at FastGraphs but if memory serves you want to check the FFO box on FastGraphs for the correct analysis of REITS and I believe mRIETS and possibly BDCs too.

For REITs and MLPs, check the Fund From Operations box. BDCs work best with Operating Earnings.
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#27
One that pays monthly that I have been considering for a while is NFI.TO, don't like its valuation right now but it pays a decent monthly dividend and a 4.43% yield. I should have bought at Oct. 15th but wasn't rushing into much with guns blazing at that point.
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#28
I suggest you start your research with dividend aristocrats and dividend achievers.

M$$I
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#29
Another high yielder on the Canadian market: Ag Growth Intl (TSE: AFN). Not really a dividend grower, but has a 4.8% yield.
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