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What are your portfolio allocation percentages?
#11
(08-28-2021, 09:44 PM)Kerim Wrote:
(08-28-2021, 09:15 PM)fenders53 Wrote: Ken, no need for you to keep  a lot of cash at your age but I do think you should have enough to grab shares on a good dip.  Those add up over time.

I second this heartily. I wish I had understood this a bit earlier in my investing life. When you play the game long enough, you'll see a handful of times when the market gets temporarily and badly out of whack. If you have the powder and the conviction, how you handle those rare opportunities can make up a huge percentage of your overall returns.
The tech bubble and aftermath taught me most of the core investing lessons I would ever need in a few years in my taxable accounts.  "Stay 100% invested they said".  Well I'm not sure "they" meant I should keep adding at triple historical PEs and use some margin to make it even better.  

-always have a little dry powder- lesson learned, I was helpless (and depressed) .... check
-stay diversified, even if the returns aren't as good in the boring out of favor sector....  check              
-never sell.... well that only works if you don't build an entire port of companies at grossly high valuations in the first place.  Many people are doing that again today, and adding options, cuz YOLO.   

Most of the ports on this forum are balanced.  This isn't the Motley Fool forum of 1994-98.   

If not for my GOV 401K which limited me to a few index ETFs I would have been in trouble there too.  There I figured out what a bond fund was for actually for to a younger investor.  I hated that 5% yield but it would have been as good as cash when the Nasdaq corrected over 80%.  Just a little invested there would have been nice.  I was ready for the 2008 GFC, and the next one whenever that year comes.  

I can't imagine the market cancelling my retirement, but I've seen it happen to a few friends that got greedy past age 50, then cashed out and curled up in the fetal position.  

What were we talking about again.  Smile   Oh yeah, 90% max in stocks no matter your age unless the market has recently been destroyed.  That's not exactly conservative advice but it served me well when accumulating.  Recency bias makes me sound foolish now.  I can live with that.
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#12
(08-29-2021, 12:41 AM)rayray Wrote: 26.05% cyclical
--1.50% basic materials
--9.91% consumer cyclical
--12.06% financial services
--2.58% real estate (reits)

22.93% defensive
--10.05% consumer defensive
--12.88% healthcare
--0% utilities

50.98% sensitive
--13.44% communications
--5.93% energy
--10.24% industrials
--21.36% technology

this is only my individual stock holdings--i didn't include etf's or mutual funds--the above consists of 57 individual stocks

overall summary:

divi yield 2.5%
YOC 3.37%
beta .98

just divi stocks by themselves

divi yield 2.95%
YOC 4.39%
beta 1.01

i'm pension eligible at a reduced rate next year at age 51

full pension will be at age 55

so let's just average it out to 5 years the earliest i'd retire
So you are 100% in equities now Ray?  That was the intended question posed in this thread.
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#13
(08-29-2021, 05:19 AM)fenders53 Wrote: What were we talking about again.  Smile   Oh yeah, 90% max in stocks no matter your age unless the market has recently been destroyed.  That's not exactly conservative advice but it served me well when accumulating.  Recency bias makes me sound foolish now.  I can live with that.

10% at least in cash, wow okay.  

Now is a really good time for me to start building my cash up from here on out.  I reached my goal of $500/month in dividends to draw on from the taxable account, and I've got the automated transfer all set up, so my budget is a-okay.  I was planning to build my cash up anyway through March of next year because I liquidated nearly $50k of company stock and I need to be ready for the tax consequences.  Plus, I've been reading all these stories about the market being overvalued and due for a massive correction, which makes me nervous to say the least.

I remember that massive 3 day drop a few months back.  The point isn't that it only took my portfolio about 3 weeks to recover, the point is that by day 3, everything was on sale.
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#14
(08-29-2021, 05:52 AM)ken-do-nim Wrote:
(08-29-2021, 05:19 AM)fenders53 Wrote: What were we talking about again.  Smile   Oh yeah, 90% max in stocks no matter your age unless the market has recently been destroyed.  That's not exactly conservative advice but it served me well when accumulating.  Recency bias makes me sound foolish now.  I can live with that.

10% at least in cash, wow okay.  

Now is a really good time for me to start building my cash up from here on out.  I reached my goal of $500/month in dividends to draw on from the taxable account, and I've got the automated transfer all set up, so my budget is a-okay.  I was planning to build my cash up anyway through March of next year because I liquidated nearly $50k of company stock and I need to be ready for the tax consequences.  Plus, I've been reading all these stories about the market being overvalued and due for a massive correction, which makes me nervous to say the least.

I remember that massive 3 day drop a few months back.  The point isn't that it only took my portfolio about 3 weeks to recover, the point is that by day 3, everything was on sale.
Doesn't always have to be 10% but 0% means no dip buying.  It's about a year since a 5% pullback so any cash seems unwise now.  We can't time crashes and we have to stay invested.  A 10% market dip usually means you have some 20% dips in your port.  It improves my mood when I can buy some sales.  Never mind crashes, routine sector rotations provide the same opportunities.  Most of the buys you see on the main thread are just folks adding a few shares of whatever is down some lately.
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#15
There's about 30k cash in my kplan

And 20k cash in my savings/checking account but that's for monthly/daily expenses and emergencies

I am in the process of moving some money around from my mutual/ETFs in the not so distant future--when that is complete the cash reserve will be, in and around 200k. Which will then be redeployed back into the market in individual stocks, slowly.
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#16
Here's my portfolio weighting as of this morning.

   
My website: DGI For The DIY
Also on: Facebook - Twitter - Seeking Alpha
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#17
Nice pie charts Eric. Even easier to see than a spreadsheet (which I assume feeds your charts).

When I started this thread I was curious if anyone has a major stake in bonds. I will when rates rise someday but they see too risky right now for the little potential reward.

We still seem to keep a DGI theme though most have added some growth stocks, which has obviously been very wise.
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#18
Ok I’ll play! This is my Fidelity account, mostly a 401(K) account. Done pretty well this last year! All mutual funds, primarily S&P Fund, Total Stock Market Find, TRP BC Growth, a mid cap Value fund and a 2030 fund. [Image: a0f92098f3bbd2dd1d9e9dc8c7a06858.jpg]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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#19
ok, this was kind of quick.

i recently moved some money around from selling some funds--built up cash position to 210k--maybe lost about 100k on paper in the market--redeployed about 80-85k.

of the cash 52k was a forced sell because i inherited a IRA that couldn't transfer from edward jones to fidelity

edward jones was the first encounter i had with a firm that you as the investor literally has no control on your investments--the process is arcane at best.
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#20
(10-02-2021, 07:19 AM)rayray Wrote: ok, this was kind of quick.

i recently moved some money around from selling some funds--built up cash position to 210k--maybe lost about 100k on paper in the market--redeployed about 80-85k.

of the cash 52k was a forced sell because i inherited a IRA that couldn't transfer from edward jones to fidelity

edward jones was the first encounter i had with a firm that you as the investor literally has no control on your investments--the process is arcane at best.

I had a friend who worked for them and he showed me a few accounts he had recently set up for customers.  It was a fee generating scheme.  $100K invested in about 10 funds.  If you new nothing about investing at all you'd be MUCH better off spending an hour on a Boglehead video and buying a couple index funds than paying them fees for decades.
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