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"Safe" high yielders - stocks, ETFs, CEFs, REITs, MLPs, etc - post your favorites!
#31
(08-03-2021, 12:05 PM)fenders53 Wrote:
(08-03-2021, 11:38 AM)So, I think it all depends on where you are on your road to retirement. I am trying to help my mom - she has ~40% of her portfolio in the vanilla S&P ETF, the rest is cash... growth isn\t important to her - capital preservation and income are. She would be very happy earning 4-5% on something that doesn Wrote: [quote pid='27746' dateline='1628006378']
That's a target you can hit without unnecessary risk.  She is likely to see some capital appreciation as well.  There are not a lot of them at the moment but when the defensive sectors dip you can grab a slow growth company that doesn't have a lot for fleas, but does have a solid dividend history.
You got ideas on these slow growth companies that are safe in that yield range? Big Grin
Where were you last year?  Smile  Ask me again in about a month.  Maybe we can buy them together.  I try to be one of those buy low and sell high if I am gonna sell at all guys.  If I am honest though I sold 15 of them the past year as they flew to the moon like I never expected.  Use your brokerage software and do a screen for stocks that pay 3.50 to 3.75% now.  Weed out the garbage and get your watch list ready.  Some of them will come to you eventually.  At some point you'll have more than you can even buy.
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I have the list ready - just looking for ideas from others. Been waiting for the correction that's not here yet...
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#32
That's all you can do for now. Other than tobacco almost all of the above average yielders are commodity based stocks and that's just not a great idea now IMO. I have a ton of cash I would like to deploy but invested enough to just wait. The Covid on-Covid off uncertainty will drive some volatility but most of those are not high Div payers.

Glad you started the thread though. This will be a good one to update as time goes on.
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#33
(08-02-2021, 05:40 PM)ken-do-nim Wrote: Here's what I'm currently invested in that has a 7%+ yield:

NLY - $15,422.59.  Swing and a miss! (since it didn't do better than T)  I have it but I've already started to trim it.

Is NLY a trap at any price? Is there some level where it is worth buying?
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#34
Perhaps after a few more dividend cuts and the share price levels out. If the earnings estimates come true the payout ratio is about 90%. That's problematic if things don't go perfect. They've cut the dividend about 5 times the past decade so they aren't afraid to do it. Look at their financials. Very inconsistent.
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#35
I strongly recommend looking at HTGC instead.

https://www.nasdaq.com/market-activity/s...nd-history

The dividend had increased to $.40 right before COVID, dropped to $.32 immediately after, and they've been building it back up since. Now back up to $.39.

And unlike the others, a look at their max price chart shows choppy, but not a downward trend like AGNC and NLY. Overall up 26% the past 5 years.
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#36
This article recommends NREF, a REIT paying 9.18% I hadn't heard of before, and ARCC.
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#37
I wouldn't touch an mREIT in these market conditions. As long as the housing sector stays healthy they can be ok. But they are very risky in general and quite frankly I smell bad times coming to the housing market sooner or later. The recent increases in price of housing are not healthy. Now the average mortgage might be somewhere around 1.5% or 2%, and these guys are pulling in enough to pay their owners 9% after covering the operating expenses. That tells you how much risk and leverage they have.

mREITs are great cash generators as long as everything goes smooth but they get rapidly wiped out when things go sour.
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#38
(08-05-2021, 04:58 AM)ken-do-nim Wrote: This article recommends NREF, a REIT paying 9.18% I hadn't heard of before, and ARCC.

ARCC is a blue chip yield trap.  Big Grin   I do like it but pull up a 20 yr chart.  Back above it's 2004 price.  Not saying it couldn't have a little more upside but it's starting to push it.  It's always on my watch list because buying it around 15 has been easy money.
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#39
(08-04-2021, 05:23 PM)ken-do-nim Wrote: I strongly recommend looking at HTGC instead.

https://www.nasdaq.com/market-activity/s...nd-history

The dividend had increased to $.40 right before COVID, dropped to $.32 immediately after, and they've been building it back up since.  Now back up to $.39.

And unlike the others, a look at their max price chart shows choppy, but not a downward trend like AGNC and NLY.  Overall up 26% the past 5 years.

Thank you for the idea - HTGC seems to be at an all time high now, so probably not the right time to dive in?
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#40
(08-06-2021, 09:15 AM)Genester Wrote:
(08-04-2021, 05:23 PM)ken-do-nim Wrote: I strongly recommend looking at HTGC instead.

https://www.nasdaq.com/market-activity/s...nd-history

The dividend had increased to $.40 right before COVID, dropped to $.32 immediately after, and they've been building it back up since.  Now back up to $.39.

And unlike the others, a look at their max price chart shows choppy, but not a downward trend like AGNC and NLY.  Overall up 26% the past 5 years.

Thank you for the idea - HTGC seems to be at an all time high now, so probably not the right time to dive in?
I'd get in on the ground floor while there is still time.  Smile
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