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favorite financial paper/online source?
#1
I've been thinking about subscribing to WSJ and or IBD--has anyone ever gotten one of these?

I really like WSJ, my neighbors use to get it and give me the papers, only problem they pack a lot of info in that paper! They would pile up on me fairly quick...assuming a lot easier with their online versions.
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#2
(11-25-2019, 06:29 AM)rayray Wrote: I've been thinking about subscribing to WSJ and or IBD--has anyone ever gotten one of these?

I really like WSJ, my neighbors use to get it and give me the papers, only problem they pack a lot of info in that paper! They would pile up on me fairly quick...assuming a lot easier with their online versions.

I have in the past but not recently.  They would definitely pile up on me.  Back in the day my favorite was Kiplingers for sure.  It got me started investing.  Like most paper mags it's a shadow of what it once was.  That said, it's a good investment of $10 for a year or two when you get old like me.  Smile  There is useful info in there for pre-retirees and retirees.  Could you find the info on the net?  Sure, if you knew what it was you were looking for. 

Back in the day the Valueline stock reports were THE source for a DIY investor.  I used to go to the library and read them in the reference section, and copy them for the investment club presentations we made to each other every month.  They were expensive to subscribe to back then.  The info you get from a decent discount brokerage account these days is nearly as good, and more updated of course.
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#3
Yea, I use to enjoy Kiplingers and Money Mag years ago--even Forbes and Fortune magazines. My grandparents use to get all of those back in the day.

I might try WSJ because I do enjoy that paper--I usually get it when we go on vacation as one of my flight reads to pass the time. I was just wondering about IBD?

Going to the library for a look would be a good idea!

I heard about Valueline!
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#4
(11-25-2019, 07:18 AM)fenders53 Wrote:
(11-25-2019, 06:29 AM)rayray Wrote: I've been thinking about subscribing to WSJ and or IBD--has anyone ever gotten one of these?

Back in the day the Valueline stock reports were THE source for a DIY investor.  I used to go to the library and read them in the reference section, and copy them for the investment club presentations we made to each other every month.  They were expensive to subscribe to back then.  The info you get from a decent discount brokerage account these days is nearly as good, and more updated of course.

I think the WSJ would have better, and more in-depth, general business news.

Back in my day, when brokerage commissions were $49.95 and up, I used to go to my broker's office in the city and make copies of the S&P report and the Value Line reports of stocks I was interrested in. None of the local libraries in our area had either available. Nowadays, in my local library here, they have paper copies of both the VL Survey and the VL Small Cap Survey. S&P research is available online from the local libraries connection. Of course, there's a plethora of information online now. Maybe too much causing "analysis paralysis".

fenders: In those days I used to get the trial subscription that lasted 13 weeks so you got the latest edition of the entire book. It only cost about $90-$100. Then I'd let it expire and take another trial a year later. Any specific details you wanted info about could be gotten by calling the broker or the company's Investor Relations department. You could also sign up for all press releases to be sent by mail from Investor Relations.

Now about the only thing I'd sign up for that cost money would be FastGraphs although I'd consider a VL trial sub. They don't offer those any more AFAIK.
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#5
(11-25-2019, 05:03 PM)rayray Wrote: Yea, I use to enjoy Kiplingers and Money Mag years ago--even Forbes and Fortune magazines. My grandparents use to get all of those back in the day.

I might try WSJ because I do enjoy that paper--I usually get it when we go on vacation as one of my flight reads to pass the time. I was just wondering about IBD?

Going to the library for a look would be a good idea!

I heard about Valueline!

Valueline was very good. Had my investment club stayed together, half the stocks and perhaps more than that are ten baggers today.  We exclusively used VL to pick stocks.  Tried to pay attention to value investing principles.  I don't know about IBD these days.  Back then it was about momentum investing period.  Purchases were made according to strong RSI and adjust as you go.  About the opposite of what we do here.  The strategy would have worked great the past ten years.  Probably not a bad way to assemble the riskier high flyers part of your port if you are interested.  It was a strat where you buy ten or more stocks and prepare to get killed on 30% with a few big winners in the mix.
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#6
Years ago I tried getting an investment club together--it didn't work. All I had was others telling me my dividend investment plan was not going to work. Funny thing I wasn't trying to convince any of the others to follow the same plan, I just wanted a few of us interested in investing and paying attention to our retirement funds get together once every month or two and talk about financial topics.

Hell, I make my own wine, have good bourbon and was willing to even cook!

And here I am on the forum lol
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#7
(11-26-2019, 08:42 PM)rayray Wrote: Years ago I tried getting an investment club together--it didn't work. All I had was others telling me my dividend investment plan was not going to work. Funny thing I wasn't trying to convince any of the others to follow the same plan, I just wanted a few of us interested in investing and paying attention to our retirement funds get together once every month or two and talk about financial topics.

Hell, I make my own wine, have good bourbon and was willing to even cook!

And here I am on the forum lol

It was a good experience overall.  I learned a lot.  We peaked at about 12 members.  Like most clubs, in the end all the work is done by just a few.  A few lost interest when they discovered it wasn't a get rich quick plan.  You really need 3-5 serious stock nerds to keep it active and not dominated by the decisions of a few.  This forum would make a fun investing club.  We'd argue until the cows came home but collectively we'd be very successful.  I'd go all in on our collective investing minds. Towards the very end the club would buy about anything I presented as they trusted me. I knew better than to make the club port as aggressive as my personal port. I understood risk better than they did and didn't want to betray their trust. An investment club would be far easier to conduct now.  Due to commissions we were mostly confined to stocks with direct investment and free DRIP programs.  We were only making $3-500 monthly purchases.  We dissolved just prior to the tech bubble and that was a blessing.  

To my recollection here is what we acquired from about 1994-1999.  

PG
CL
INTC
MSFT
NWL
RPM
MOT 
LU
KO
PEP
MCD
WMT
DE

There were a couple more I don't recall.  Whomever made Sara Lee or Dolly Madison snacks.  And the YUM spin off from our PEP shares.  I think we dumped our worthless YUM shares for like $10 lol, but we only had a few of those.      

Most of those aged very well. Lucent and Motorola are the big busts on that list but we got lucky and dissolved at the right time.
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#8
rayray: Just linked to the IBD website from a Yahoo finance article and they have a Black Friday deal of 8 weeks for $8. Sounds like a deal if you want to get a taste of the daily.
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