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What would you buy...
#11
(07-29-2019, 06:06 PM)fenders53 Wrote:
(07-29-2019, 03:53 PM)NilesMike Wrote:
(07-29-2019, 07:34 AM)fenders53 Wrote: -If you're nice to me I might throw you some UTE picks sometime so you too can have some safe ten baggers.  

.........
I've been nice. 
You've been very nice Mike.  When I find the next one I'm going to tell you first lol.

I've owned a lot of stocks the past 35 years and it's pretty crazy a UTE is my lifetime best pick.  I purchased XEL when it dropped 60%+.  I don't even recall the reason for the decline, but I wondered what Minneapolis would do if they went out of business.  It was Northern States Power NSP at the time and, of course they had no real competitors, nor did they go out of business and merged later.  Anyway, I collected some big DRIP all these years due to my entry point when I luckily caught the bottom around $7.50 SP.  It took over 15 years but my one and only ten bagger.  Bettter than a ten bagger actually.  I've owned a lot of high flying tech stocks but I have never timed it like this.  It's good to be lucky.  Sadly I only bought like 125 shares but that was a bold purchase for me back then.

Nice, and it is much better to be lucky than good!
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#12
CSCO is looking interesting after today's drop. Very close to 3% yield. Will add more if the slide continues.
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#13
Just did a little bookkeeping regarding the downward move. July 29 to today's close the SPX is down slightly more than 6%.

7 of my holdings are down similarly.
3 are flat
5 are down significantly more the market
4 stocks are up.

The tickers that are up during the down move are BGS, VGR, and O
Flat is D, GIS, T
Down are IBM, MPC, MET, BEN, BUD

Not sure what, if anything can be learned from this but thought it my be of interest.
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#14
We should do an end of year thread. I believe it's a good idea to assess your performance honestly against the SPX since that can be done with zero effort. And against your goals. My goals are modest as I need a 4% return to meet my retirement fund goal four years from almost exactly one year ago. Last year when I took full control of my GOV and Roth IRA accounts. The goal was to avoid losing money because you shouldn't have to go too wild to get 4% total return. (Lately I am about 50% cash and very short bonds). Anyway, your goal matters when analyzing your personal performance

-since July 29th I am down about 3%.
-Last 12 months (or very close to 365 days) SPX is down about 2%, I am up 3%

I'm calling that a win. Missed my 4% goal but it could be worse. This is 1000% due to the fact I have collected so much income selling puts and calls this year. I purchased some real turkey yield trap stocks right before steep drops. I've done that repeatedly this year I've had covered calls sold against every one of my positions for months. Some of them were in the money so I missed some of the pain. I need to be more patient next time because I was deep in the money on several positions, only a few weeks ago.

It's about time to go shopping with some of this cash.
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#15
I didn’t go back to exactly July 29, but from the high water mark in July I am down around 4%.

YTD, still showing about 11% up and just over 7% from 1 year ago.
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#16
(08-15-2019, 08:33 AM)Ron Ricco Wrote: I didn’t go back to exactly July 29, but from the high water mark in July I am down around 4%.

YTD, still showing about 11% up and just over 7% from 1 year ago.

7% is really good Ron.  The average index investor has to be sitting really close to even the past 12MO, and maybe down a little.  I really think our attraction to dividend stocks is going to help us when the market is rough.  There is just no other place to get a safe yield and beat inflation.  Bond funds are likely to take a hit at the first sign of good news.
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#17
(08-15-2019, 09:09 AM)fenders53 Wrote:
(08-15-2019, 08:33 AM)Ron Ricco Wrote: I didn’t go back to exactly July 29, but from the high water mark in July I am down around 4%.

YTD, still showing about 11% up and just over 7% from 1 year ago.

7% is really good Ron.  The average index investor has to be sitting really close to even the past 12MO, and maybe down a little.  I really think our attraction to dividend stocks is going to help us when the market is rough.  There is just no other place to get a safe yield and beat inflation.  Bond funds are likely to take a hit at the first sign of good news.

I was a little surprised at the YOY number as the YOD is the default on the fidelity site. Dividend yield is   in the high 3s which helps, but I am not sure what stocks carried the rest of the 7% load. I could probably go through and figure it out, but they are most likely the ones falling the fastest now LOL.
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#18
(08-15-2019, 09:09 AM)fenders53 Wrote:
(08-15-2019, 08:33 AM)Ron Ricco Wrote: I didn’t go back to exactly July 29, but from the high water mark in July I am down around 4%.

YTD, still showing about 11% up and just over 7% from 1 year ago.

7% is really good Ron.  The average index investor has to be sitting really close to even the past 12MO, and maybe down a little.  I really think our attraction to dividend stocks is going to help us when the market is rough.  There is just no other place to get a safe yield and beat inflation.  Bond funds are likely to take a hit at the first sign of good news.

I'm still not sure what to make of bonds. The 30-year chart on bonds would suggest that we are still near the top of an unprecedented bond bull market, and that reversion to mean in terms of interest rates will absolutely kill bonds.

That said, long term demographic trends of an aging population and population growth falling to or below replacement levels point to long-term deflationary pressures. Then again, that same aging population will likely create even more government debt through healthcare spending, and that increased debt load will have a less prosperous and smaller cohort of working-age people to support it. 

These are also trends that will impact companies with progressive dividend policies. Retirees don't tend to consume as much across all sectors as working age people with kids, which appear to be a diminishing demographic. They may consume more in certain sectors (healthcare), but that increased consumption invites government regulation and price controls (and old people vote). 

My magic eight ball says not sure, so I just keep putting money in the pot as often as I can, and hope for the best.
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#19
(08-15-2019, 09:20 AM)Ron Ricco Wrote:
(08-15-2019, 09:09 AM)fenders53 Wrote:
(08-15-2019, 08:33 AM)Ron Ricco Wrote: I didn’t go back to exactly July 29, but from the high water mark in July I am down around 4%.

YTD, still showing about 11% up and just over 7% from 1 year ago.

7% is really good Ron.  The average index investor has to be sitting really close to even the past 12MO, and maybe down a little.  I really think our attraction to dividend stocks is going to help us when the market is rough.  There is just no other place to get a safe yield and beat inflation.  Bond funds are likely to take a hit at the first sign of good news.

I was a little surprised at the YOY number as the YOD is the default on the fidelity site. Dividend yield is   in the high 3s which helps, but I am not sure what stocks carried the rest of the 7% load. I could probably go through and figure it out, but they are most likely the ones falling the fastest now LOL.
Yes, back when I was more aggressively invested I was definitely a "jeanyus" one month and a fool the next.  I really want to add a few more aggressive growth stocks but I am going to continue to be patient.  It's breath taking how fast you can give up a years gains if you aren't careful with your entry price.
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#20
So Ladies and Gentlemen, what would you buy? On my radar are: MMM, EMN, LEG, SKT, CMI, these are available at a historically high yield. So are Canadian banks. MO is crazy good in my opinion. One company I just disovered and trying to get familiar with is MEOH.
What companies are on your watch lists?
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