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Strategies for Building a DGI Portfolio
#31
Off the grid is certainly not for everyone, and I sure wouldn't want to live in the poverty that comes with it full-time, but it's a refreshing time to forget about technology and enjoy nature in the few places it still exists undisturbed. You don't forget the beauty and wildness. My buddy has a small generator and fuel he hauls out by snow machine during the winter. He can charge up a cell phone and find a place to get a signal if there was a true emergency. But it's still primitive enough to enjoy the thrill, by a wide margin. Some of of my favorite memories for sure. Flyfishing is my passion, so it's catch them the hard way or fail and try again some other time.
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#32
Now we're talking! I spent some time up in Alaska in my younger days. I think I came kinda close to dropping out and just living out in the woods up there. I guess I'm glad I didn't, but such good memories -- I'd love to get back up there. And more travel in general would be great. Between work and parenting there isn't much time left over for it, but someday....

83 countries is amazing, Otter!
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#33
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I'm all for frugality when it comes to cars. Purchased my current car new for $16,000 six years ago (it's tiny). Only has 21,000 miles on it, and I intend to keep driving it until it doesn't go anymore (which should hopefully be a long time, given the low mileage). .
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I've been driving for 44 years and have always had unique to semi classic cars. Not counting money spent on routine mainetenance on them, I am out of pocket roughly 35K for the entire 44 years and always had fun cars to drive,
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#34
(12-18-2018, 07:40 AM)NilesMike Wrote: ]

I'm all for frugality when it comes to cars. Purchased my current car new for $16,000 six years ago (it's tiny). Only has 21,000 miles on it, and I intend to keep driving it until it doesn't go anymore (which should hopefully be a long time, given the low mileage).  .
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I've been driving for 44 years and have always had unique to semi classic cars. Not counting money spent on routine mainetenance on them, I am out of pocket roughly 35K for the entire 44 years and always had fun cars to drive,
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Since this a now a vacation and car thread.  Smile  I currently have a few toys.  And since we are all about the money, I wasted perhaps $12K on this one.  Always wanted to build a streetable car that would lift the front wheels.  I don't get to the track much lately because it has a bad habit of busting axles and other such inconveniences that make it hard to drive home.  This was a warm-up run for a charity event later in the day.  A bunch of us threw up some parts and labor for a young man with terminal cancer and built him a pretty fast 85 Mustang.   He got a few runs in before he passed way. I should dig up a pic of his 85 Mustang GT we built.  
[Image: QVrRrxL.jpg]
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#35
Here's a King (Chinook) Salmon from Alaska.  This was my first decent King and took about four days to catch her.  Caught my second one 20 minutes later.  Just a few miles short of her journey to the spawning grounds so I let them go because I am weird like that.   Salmon fishing is getting very tough in most of AK due to the snowcaps (glaciers) melting off the mountains this past decade.   

 [Image: pOYixzS.jpg]
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#36
Nice fish!

In the day, those Mustangs spent a lot of time studying my GN tail lights. LOL
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#37
LOL, my buddy bought two GNs when we were just out of high school a few years. One still has under 20K miles on it and the other burned in a barn fire. They were really fast for the era. He has a Buick GSX Stage 1 vert as well. Total Buick nut. When my stang was primered, I enjoyed looking for high dollar cars at the track to victimize. Some of the special edition Vettes were tough though. There is always somebody faster than you no matter how much you spend.
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#38
No point in investing if you don't have any hobbies or passions to pursue once you've hit your goal (or along the way). Gotta enjoy the pursuit while making your way towards the goal.

I go frugal in the areas that don't interest me as much (cars), so that I enjoy the pursuit by spending on stuff that keeps me happy (travel and homebrewing stuff, mostly). I try never to cross an ocean in coach. Probably spend more time churning credit cards for bonuses than I should (and issuers like Chase have certainly made the game harder the past few years), but that seat better go horizontal and be paired with a decent wine list if I'm spending 12-15 hours in a metal/carbon-fiber tube.
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#39
Back to the subject, I think I am going to visit your strategy for awhile.  Purchasing 100 shares of one stock is getting painful in this market.  I think it might be time to add some new positions that are truly cheap now.  Of course I thought they were already pretty cheap last month.  Smile  I can always consolidate positions after the dust settles in this market.
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#40
(12-20-2018, 05:01 PM)fenders53 Wrote: Back to the subject, I think I am going to visit your strategy for awhile.  Purchasing 100 shares of one stock is getting painful in this market.  I think it might be time to add some new positions that are truly cheap now.  Of course I thought they were already pretty cheap last month.  Smile  I can always consolidate positions after the dust settles in this market.

I have a Robinhood account exactly for this sort of thing. I have a minimum purchase amount for my other brokerage accounts, to keep the commission under 0.5% of any single purchase, but the Robinhood account is for opportunistic snagging of shares with couch cushion money (and whatever dividends pile up there).
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