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My Portfolio (New Member)
#1
Hello,

I guess I'll post my current holdings in my portfolio. I'm 26 years old and I only started investing in dividend stocks early this year.

Dividend Stocks
BCE (tsx) 25 shares
CVE (tsx) 24 shares
DRG.un (tsx) 100 shares
ENB (tsx) 50 shares
GE (nyse) 55 shares
G (tsx) 115 shares
POT (tsx) 34 shares
TD (tsx) 25 shares

Mutual Fund Holdings:
- CIBC NASDAQ Index (This is where I have exposure to technology stocks) - 103.5 units
- CIBC Monthly Income Fund - 1274 units
- CIBC Managed Income Fund - 389 units
- TD DJIA Index - 264.725 units
- TD International Index - 231.199 units

I may eventually transfer my investments from my CIBC Monthly Income Fund and CIBC Managed Income Fund to dividend stocks... but for now, it'll do. I invested in these two when I was young and listened to those investment advisors... High MER but it has decent returns...

I'm in a very awkward stage of my life where I need to look to invest in real estate (ie. move out of my parents home) but the housing market's just crazy where I live (Greater Toronto Area)... So I thought I'd stick to dividend stocks for now.

The following are on my watch list (I find some of these are too expensive right now): PEP, KO, KMI, PG, MMM, SBUX, CHE.UN, Hydro One (IPO next month), WMT (considering this...)

Comments/Suggestions welcome :-)

Thanks!
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#2
Paul, you've got a good start there.

(10-25-2015, 12:05 PM)jhpaul Wrote: I'm in a very awkward stage of my life where I need to look to invest in real estate (ie. move out of my parents home) but the housing market's just crazy where I live (Greater Toronto Area)... So I thought I'd stick to dividend stocks for now.

Ummmm, at 26 it may be time to move on Blush but I wouldn't be in a rush to buy a "money pit" just yet. Especially in your market right now. An apartment in the suburbs maybe? Oshawa? Oakville? Get your emergency funds locked up, add a little to your portfolio as you go, drop in to the Zanzi on Yonge every once in a while (did I say that? Angel ) and enjoy life.

I just commented on BLTN's portfolio thread over here for a U.S.-centric view. We have quite a few Canadians here that may have some good suggestions for you too.

Looking forward to seeing how you progress.
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#3
(10-25-2015, 12:05 PM)jhpaul Wrote: I invested in these two when I was young

You're still young! You're off to an incredible start given your age. I am not very familiar with a number of your holdings, so it is difficult for me to evaluate, but the time factor makes your selections process more forgiving.

(10-25-2015, 12:05 PM)jhpaul Wrote: I'm in a very awkward stage of my life where I need to look to invest in real estate (ie. move out of my parents home)

I understand that life is a whole lot more than finances, but from a financial standpoint, if you can stand it, maybe staying under their roof a bit longer would be worth it (if you can stand it)? That is assuming that the arrangement allows you to save a lot of your income that would otherwise be going toward housing. If you do move out and are considering buying, maybe look for a duplex or a multi-room place where you can rent out the other rooms and have tenants subsidize your living. That would be a great way to move out but not take a large financial hit, while diversifying your income streams.
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#4
(10-25-2015, 09:12 PM)Dividend Watcher Wrote: Paul, you've got a good start there.

(10-25-2015, 12:05 PM)jhpaul Wrote: I'm in a very awkward stage of my life where I need to look to invest in real estate (ie. move out of my parents home) but the housing market's just crazy where I live (Greater Toronto Area)... So I thought I'd stick to dividend stocks for now.

Ummmm, at 26 it may be time to move on Blush but I wouldn't be in a rush to buy a "money pit" just yet. Especially in your market right now. An apartment in the suburbs maybe? Oshawa? Oakville? Get your emergency funds locked up, add a little to your portfolio as you go, drop in to the Zanzi on Yonge every once in a while (did I say that? Angel ) and enjoy life.

I just commented on BLTN's portfolio thread over here for a U.S.-centric view. We have quite a few Canadians here that may have some good suggestions for you too.

Looking forward to seeing how you progress.

Thanks for your comments. I know, I need to move out soon. But I'm saving so much money living with my parents Big Grin

I looked over your reply to BLTN's thread. Good recommendations there. Thanks. I will need to do some more research before picking my next purchase!

(10-26-2015, 09:32 AM)Kerim Wrote:
(10-25-2015, 12:05 PM)jhpaul Wrote: I invested in these two when I was young

You're still young! You're off to an incredible start given your age. I am not very familiar with a number of your holdings, so it is difficult for me to evaluate, but the time factor makes your selections process more forgiving.

(10-25-2015, 12:05 PM)jhpaul Wrote: I'm in a very awkward stage of my life where I need to look to invest in real estate (ie. move out of my parents home)

I understand that life is a whole lot more than finances, but from a financial standpoint, if you can stand it, maybe staying under their roof a bit longer would be worth it (if you can stand it)? That is assuming that the arrangement allows you to save a lot of your income that would otherwise be going toward housing. If you do move out and are considering buying, maybe look for a duplex or a multi-room place where you can rent out the other rooms and have tenants subsidize your living. That would be a great way to move out but not take a large financial hit, while diversifying your income streams.

Hi. I would say almost 40% of my investments are in the CIBC Monthly Income Fund (added the # of units I own to my original post). That's because this was my only investment before I started purchasing other mutual funds and dividend stocks.

That's my plan - stay under their roof for another 2-3 years and then move out..... there's plenty of new developments in my area so I need to start looking into them soon!

Thanks for your comments Smile
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#5
Oh man to be 26 again!!

Dividend investing at 26? Great choice! At that age, drinking, golf, an occasional woman, more golf and a lot more drinking was my choice. Then there was that fixer upper I bought at age 27 that really ate into my activities or maybe those activities ate into my fixer upper time? I forget.

Okay, I'm going to go day dream a bit and reminisce...about golf...yea golfBig Grin

Keep on investing, buy quality and never over pay.
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#6
Welcome to the forum. That's a nice start you have there!

About the housing part... the way I understand it is that you are looking to buy your own place. But why buy directly? It would make sense to me to rent for a while... it's a whole new world anyway moving out on your own. So at least give it a try by renting, that also allows you to continue investing (even if the rent does take a bite out of your income) and you will live debt free instead of having a huge mortgage. So give that a thought. I'm 26 too and I've pondered about buying many times now (I've been living on my own for 10 years already) but I still haven't found a place where I want to settle down in the long run so renting has worked well for me.
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#7
Looks like you are off to a great start! I own GE as well. I also like EMR.
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#8
(10-25-2015, 12:05 PM)jhpaul - 10 months later Wrote: It's been 10 months since I've visited this website. I've been really busy with life lately - I've recently got a new job (with the same company; small increase in pay) and I started learning a new language (Spanish). I am hoping to be more active in this forum later in the year. But I have been purchasing more stocks within the last couple of months to increase my dividend income. Here's an update as to how much have changed since my first post 10 months ago.

Dividend Stocks
BCE (tsx)       25 shares  -  Shy
CVE (tsx)       24 shares -  Shy
DRG.un (tsx)  100 shares -  Shy
ENB (tsx)       50 shares -  Shy  - Thinking of adding adding more shares; lost about 20% in value; but this is definitely long-term
GE (nyse)      55 shares -  Shy
G (tsx)          115 shares - SOLD
POT (tsx)       34 shares -  Shy  (Potash market crashed this year; so I lost about 50% of the value but I am holding it for long term)
TD (tsx)        25 shares -  Shy
H (tsx-)        75 shares  - NEW ADDITION
DIS (nyse)    12 shares - NEW ADDITION
CNR (tsx)      20 - NEW ADDITION
MFC (tsx)      100 - NEW ADDITION
MG (tsx)      25 - NEW ADDITION
ABBV (nyse) - Purchased it earlier in the year but sold it after a few weeks


Mutual Fund Holdings:
- CIBC NASDAQ Index (This is where I have exposure to technology stocks) - 103.5 units  - 103.835 units 
- CIBC Monthly Income Fund   - 1274 units - 1471 units
- CIBC Managed Income Fund  - 389 units - unchanged
- TD DJIA Index - 264.725 units - 269.26 units
- TD International Index - 231.199 units - 236 units

You will notice that I have not added any new shares to existing stocks that I own. I've just purchased new stocks. I've increased my annual dividends by about 80% since the last time I posted. I want to purchase more shares in the tsx since I am Canadian. If anyone else is an investor in the Canadian market, please feel free to share your thoughts! If you have any recommendations for purchase in the tsx market, please feel free to share Smile.

Thanks!
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#9
jhpaul, you've certainly expanded your portfolio. Hopefully you've gotten some of them at a good value. At your age, you've got a good start. What are your plans for the near term -- are you going to add to your current positions or are you still looking to expand your holdings?

I notice healthcare is conspicuously absent. Scanning the Canadian Dividend All-Star list, I didn't see any healthcare companies listed so you may be forced into a US or European company. Curious as to why you traded in and out of ABBV?

Don't blame you for looking for Canadian issues so you don't have forex fluctuations. I have some Canadian stocks in our IRAs and the dividends fluctuate also. I am comfortable in the long term it will average out as long as I don't have to count on every penny once I reach the withdrawal phase.

Hopefully some of the other "northern neighbors" will weigh in soon.
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